Straw Bale House | Kent Potter - Paja Construction

Straw Bale House | Kent Potter

Fully Accessible Load-bearing Straw Bale House

  • Straw Bale Home North Face-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home VI-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home VII-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home V-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Porch Detail-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home VIII-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home Vigas Detail-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Window View-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Window Detail-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Window Detail II-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Corridor-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Livingroom Cathedral Ceiling-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Bedroom Wing-1920x700_mini
  • Straw Bale Home Bedroom Wing West-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter’s Straw Bale Home Corridor II-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home Kitchen-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home Living room WindowsI-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home II-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home South Face-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home South Face Close-up-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home Exterior Windows-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home Exterior Window Detail-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home IV-1920x700_mini
  • Kent Potter Straw Bale Home III-1920x700_mini

Load-Bearing Straw Bale Process:

Background

Kent Potter contacted Paja Construction in 2007. As an architect for 30 years, Kent was looking for a builder who could utilize natural green building methods and had knowledge about straw bale house construction.  Kent had researched other forms of natural construction over his career (such as adobe, rammed earth, cob, waddle and dorb, light straw).

“Of all that Kent Potter researched and tested, he found straw bale to be the most economical, beautiful, and energy efficient building material.”

During the final design process, Kent and Cadmon, owner and operator of Paja Construction, decided that they would apply for NM’s first load-bearing straw bale house permit, which, although it is not allowed in NM, it can be obtained on a case-by case-basis.  Construction started in late 2008 in september, and completed six months later.

The entire house is designed to be fully accessible for individuals in wheelchairs. Kent Potter’s house applies with the American disabilities act and includes the principles of universal design, from which everyone can benefit.

Since this was a load-bearing straw bale house, the structural components were carefully utilized by two separate structural engineers before being stamped and approved by the state. Construction of the load-bearing structure was completed flawlessly, and it has become an example of the ability to utilize load-bearing straw bale construction in collaboration with architectural design that will not overload the south facing portion of a straw bale structure, which typically has many windows.

Summary

  • 2000 sq feet Straw Bale Home
  • Two bedrooms
  • Two bath
  • Double Insulated Foundations
  • Venetian Plaster  Interior
  • Full RO Water Filtration System

Features

  • Solar Water Heater
  • Rainwater Catchment System
  • Super-insulated Straw Bale Exterior
  • Cathedral Ceiling in Kitchen and Living Room